The Rake Article on Breanish Tweed

Love The Rake Magazine. And also love Simon Crompton’s blog at http://www.permanentstyle.com. One of the best blogs about menswear/luxury/craft there is.

We were lucky enough to have Simon visit us on Lewis, with photographer Andy Barnham, and this piece came out of it.

We also wove a one-off tweed for Permanent Style, which was a lovely project.

Anyway, enough chat. Here it is.

 

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GQ Japan Article

A piece on Breanish Tweed in GQ Japan, and a mention from the great Mr Kurino at United Arrows.

Hirofumi Kurino : Managing Director, Creative Advisor, United Arrows Ltd.

Since the Great East Japan Earthquake last year, I’ve been wondering what really constitutes a luxury, and thinking the criteria may have changed. I suspect a luxury may not be something famous or something new, but something whose creation involved considerable human labour.

The suit I am wearing now is this Autumn/winter’s three-piece from District. I had them weave a lightweight Breanish Tweed cloth from the Outer Hebrrides, and had the suit made in Japan. The fabric has the simplicity and freshness that is unique to hand weaving.

When I ordered it last year, I asked Iain, who is in charge of design, to make it the colour of the sea, so he created a fabric in the colours of the sea as he saw it, deep blue plus green and light blue. I heard that the shoe designer, Manolo Blahnik had a Breanish Tweed suit custom made through a tailor in Savile Row. This means that something made on an island where only 2,000 people live was delivered to a man who understands the essential qualities of things.

Scottish brands such as the beautifully coloured tartans of Lochcarron, Johnstons who modernised cashmere, and Harris Tweed all involve human labour and touch the heart because, in a good sense, they are imperfect. Right now, they may be close to the things I like best.

 

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